Below are factsheets and other information resources relating to reconciliation in New South Wales.

Anti-Racism Education

Microaggressions are the everyday negative behaviours, towards a marginalised group, that stem from prejudice. You can find out what microaggressions towards First Nations Peoples look like in practice by reading our factsheet. It is important to recognise microaggressions and call them out!

To some extent, everyone harbours unconscious bias.  Read our factsheet and learn how to recognise when unconscious bias is affecting decisions.

Systemic Racism is deeply woven into the fabric of Australian society. Read our factsheet to better understand how it operates and the outcomes it produces.

White Privilege can be a difficult concept to understand. Find some useful tips for unpacking what it means in our factsheet. 

Read our Allyship Factsheet and learn what it means to be a good ally, standing behind First Nations people and calling out racism when you see it.

The first factsheet in our anti-racism tookit, Racial Literacy is the foundational knowledge needed to understand the complexity of racism.

What is Reconciliation?

Learn about the movement for reconciliation in Australia.

The History of Reconciliation

 

 

Read how we address each of the 5 dimensions of reconciliation in our work.

Our commitment to the 5 Dimensions

Reconciliation Australia’s 2021 report, The State of Reconciliation in Australia, examines the progress of reconciliation since the establishment of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation in 1991. The report measures this progress against five benchmarks of reconciliation in Australia: race relations, equality & equity, unity, institutional integrity, and historical acceptance. The full report can be viewed at Reconciliation Australia’s website.

How can I Support Reconciliation?

Reconciliation is more than a word – it takes action.
We invite you to take braver and more impactful action. Find out how you can learn, act and share to progress the movement towards a reconciled, just and equitable Australia.

How Can I Progress Reconciliation as an Individual?

Reconciliation is more than a word – it takes action.
We invite you to take braver and more impactful action. Find out how your workplace can learn, act and share to progress the movement towards a reconciled, just and equitable Australia.

How Can My Workplace Support Reconciliation?

Reconciliation is more than a word – it takes action.
We invite you to take braver and more impactful action. Find out how your school can learn, act and share to progress the movement towards a reconciled, just and equitable Australia.

How Can my School Support Reconciliation?

Local Reconciliation Groups

Local Reconciliation Groups are an important part of progressing Reconciliation at the local level. Reconciliation NSW is keen to build on the high levels of interest and engagement in First Nations perspectives, ways of knowing and truth telling. Help us grow our network, we want to connect with established community groups who are working in this space and encourage a new generation to get involved and act for reconciliation.

How to Start a Local Reconciliation Group

January 26

January 26 is an important day to engage in truth-telling and discussions around the histories of the land now referred to as Australia. Celebrations of ‘Australia Day’ have been boycotted by Aboriginal leaders since the 1800s.

Check out our January 26 Fact Sheet.

Allies

We are often asked for recommendations for things allies can watch to continue to educate themselves and enjoy the wealth of amazing First Nations talent in film & television. Check out our Recommended Viewing list for Reconciliation Allies.

We are often asked for recommendations for books allies can read to continue to educate themselves and enjoy the wealth of amazing First Nations talent in literature. Check out our Reconciliation Ally Reading List.

Useful Resources

Read the factsheet HERE

Read the factsheet HERE

In 2016, New South Wales appeared to be falling behind its state counterparts in policy and legislation initiatives at a time when incarceration rates are rising, there are significant health disparities between Indigenous and non­Indigenous peoples, and a rising rate of Indigenous suicide, which is now the most common cause of death for 15­-35 year olds. This factsheet unpacks developments in New South Wales across key areas of: justice, education, health, reparations, politics, land & housing, gender & children, and art & culture.

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